Do you Give a fork! about waste?

Sustainable Table is asking people to Give a Fork! about waste during the month of October by hosting a #wastefree meal with friends or dining at a partner restaurant. Now in its second year, the Give a Fork! campaign encourages people to address the environmental impacts of their food choices over a meal with mates.

Waste is something I have always been conscious of and tried to minimise, but when I started reading the statistics, I realised so much more needed to be done.

Did you know:

We throw away one in every five bags of groceries, whilst 2 million Australians don’t have enough to eat and rely on food relief.

13,000 pieces of plastic litter are floating on every square kilometre of ocean today.

But where does all the waste come from?

  • Australians throw out over $8 billion worth of food – that’s 4,000,000 tonnes – every year
  • We also throw out 1.9 million tonnes of packaging each year – enough to fill the MCG 9 times over
  • Food waste comes from everyday people as well as businesses and producers throwing food in the bin.
  • Packaging waste stems from all the wrappings our food comes in – think of all the plastic bottles, foil packets and plastic bags that you see lining the food aisles at the shops

Here is what we are throwing away:

$2.67 billion of fresh food
$2.18 billion of leftovers
$1.17 billion of packaged and long-life products
$727 million of drinks
$727 million of frozen food
$566 million of takeaways

(Source: www.foodwise.com.au/foodwaste/food-waste-fast-facts/)

Take a minute to think about the environment:

  • Most of Australia’s wasted food ends up in landfill, where it rots and emits large amounts of methane, a greenhouse gas 25 times more potent than the carbon emissions that come out of your car.
  • Packaging waste in landfill produces the same amount of greenhouse gas as 860,000 cars.
  • Wasted food and packaging is also a criminal waste of all the resources and labour that went into producing it: land, water, gas, electricity, human labour and animals.

If reading that bothered you as much as it did me, you’ll want to know what you can do…

IN HOME GIVE A FORK EVENTS

Step 1.
Sign up online at giveafork.com.au  Sign up is free. When signing up, hosts choose how much they would like to sell tickets for to attend their event. A portion of this, of the host’s choosing, will go towards supporting Sustainable Table’s Awareness and Education Program and a fair food future.

Step 2.
Receive a free Lose Waste ebook Once hosts have signed up, they receive a Lose Waste
eBook, jam-packed with information to support them in hosting a #GiveaFork! #wastefree meal and living #wastefree into the future. Guests also receive a copy.

Step 3.
Hosts are sent an invitation flier and unique URL so that they can start selling tickets to their #GiveaFork! meal straight away
All guests have to do is click the link and purchase a ticket. Hosts receive all RSVPs via email.

 

If you prefer to dine out than dine in, check the list of participating restaurants here and ask for their Give a Fork! special.

 

WHERE THE FUNDS GO

Funds raised through Give a Fork! will provide vital support to Sustainable Table, an environmental not-for-profit. Sustainable Table’s Awareness and Education Program helps to build a better food system. It informs Australians about how our food is produced and what impact our food choices have on the environment, farmers, animals and communities. As consumers, we hold great power. Through our shopping dollar we can encourage more sustainable and ethical practices by those in the food industry. Sustainable Table works to raise consumer awareness of these issues so that we can all make a positive difference.

Sustainable Table also supports sustainable food and agriculture initiatives in developing countries through their International Projects.

For more information about the campaign visit – giveafork.com.au
For more information about Sustainable Table visit – sustainabletable.org.au

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